The Individualized Learning Project for Science

 

Suffield High School Graduation Expectation:

Know and apply the basic concepts of and the interrelations among Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth (including Ecology) and Space Sciences.

 

The Individualized Learning Project for Science shall be completed by students who have NOT:

            -met the proficiency standard on the Science portion of the CAPT, either on the original test or retake.

            -successfully completed the CAPT remediation course and summative assessment.

 

Each student will be required to successfully complete four tasks. The student will be required to successfully communicate understanding of basic concepts of Earth, Life, and Physical Science in explaining three ďcurious questionsĒ. The student will also be required to design, conduct, and analyze an experiment. Also attached is a contract that each student and their parents will sign prior to any given task. Enclosed are sample tasks, and experiments.

 

The three question responses will be graded using the first four aspects of the science school wide rubric. The students are familiar with this rubric, since it is used to score open-ended questions in grades 9-11, as well as on all CAPT practices. Each question has a score of 0-3. The questions should be scored by the studentís project advisor as well as by a science teacher. It is recommended that each task be given a maximum of three weeks to complete.

 

The experimentation task will be graded using the last three aspects of the science school wide rubric. The students are familiar with this rubric as well. The CAPT analytical rubric used to define tasks has a possible 12 points. It is recommended that the experiment be given a maximum of two months to complete.

 

The maximum number of points on the entire ILP is 21 (3 on each question, and 12 on the experiment) and each student will need to reach proficiency in order to pass the project.  All tasks should be completed by midterms.

 

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NAME_______________________

DATE_________________

DUE DATE______________

STRAND (Earth, Life, Physical, Experimentation)_______________

I understand that I am to complete this task independently and that I must try to the best of my ability to provide all resources, data, and graphs. I know that I may use science books, Internet resources, as well as science equipment including technology. I may need to interview staff members to help complete this activity, but that the thinking described in my communications is my own. My communication of answers to questions, and analysis of experiments may be written, verbal (recorded), or visual. I understand how my work will be graded using the Science Rubric (see attached) and I may be expected to further explain my results. I also understand that I need to successfully complete this project in order to graduate.

_______________________________________      (my signature)

 

_______________________________________      (parent signature)

 

*********************************************************************

I have interviewed the following people to complete this task.

 

1. ____________________________                        _____________________(signature)

 

2. ____________________________                        _____________________(signature)

 

3. ____________________________                        _____________________(signature)

 

4. ____________________________                        _____________________(signature)

 

 

I have used the following resources to complete this task.

 

1. ____________________________                        5. _____________________

 

2. ____________________________                        6. _____________________

 

3. ____________________________                        7. _____________________

 

4. ____________________________                        8. _____________________

 

*****************************

Score on this task:    _____________            

 

(0-3 pts on questions, 0-12 pts on experiment)

 


SAMPLE TASKs  QUESTIONS

Using research from books, magazines, Internet, staff, communicate YOUR understanding in answering these ďcuriosityĒ questions as fully explained to an elementary student and how this is associated to real life. Your explanation should not use any words that you do not understand, and could include drawings, charts, or other interesting related information.

Pick one question from each subject area.

 


EARTH SCIENCE:

 

What will happen to the Sun?

 

What causes the seasons?

 

What would happen if we had no moon?

 

Why is there no planet between Mars and Jupiter?

 

What will happen to California ?

 

What causes smog?

 

What causes storms?

 

What will happen because of global warming?

 

Where do diamonds come from?

 

Why are we all made of ďstardustĒ?

 

What causes a black hole?

 

Which is the best energy source for electricity?

LIFE SCIENCE:

 

How do antibiotics work?

 

What causes cancer?

 

How can birds fly?

 

How do we know about dinosaurs?

 

Where did the cave dwellers go?

 

How do we get seedless grapes?

 

Why do snakes dart out their tongues?

 

Why does your skin wrinkle?

 

What causes fingerprints, and why is everyone different?

 

Why does looking at the sun cause you to sneeze?

 

How do cows digest food?

 

 

 

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

 

What causes gravity?

 

Why does water boil at a lower temperature in the mountains?

 

How does a steel ship float?

 

Why is the sky blue in the day and red at sunset?

 

What causes lightning and thunder?

 

How is plastic made?

 

How did they make the atomic bomb?

 

How do light bulbs work?

 

How do CD players work?

 

What causes a sonic boom?

 

Why canít things go faster than light?

 

What causes color?


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SAMPLE EXPERIMENTATION TASK

Students should design, conduct, and analyze an experiment that tests which factor causes the most effect on some property. There should be an independent variable, dependent variable, control group, experimental group. After conducting the experiment, students should analyze results, using an appropriate graph, and draw conclusions.

 

What factors change how a pendulum swings?

 

Which materials (sand, potting soil, limestone) or combination change the acidity and percolation rate of acid rainfall?

 

What factors about materials (type, amount, covering) best insulate a cup of  water?

 

What factors about rock salt (type, amount, surface area) causes ice to melt? (speed, amount)

 

What factors about water (amount, temperature, salinity) change how plant cells respond?

 

What factors change the metabolism of a frog?

 

Which factors (mass, angle of ramp, shape, lubrication, etc...) change how (speed, distance after, straightness) toy cars go down ramps?

 

What factors (color, filters, distance, angle, power) change the brightness of a light?

 

What factors (temperature, amount, bubbles, purity) change how fast water freezes?

 

What factors (angle, mass, shape, material, color) change how (speed, distance, path)  a sphere is thrown?

 

What factors (shape, bottom, materials, purity of water, ) change how (speed, turbulence) a river/stream flows?

 

What factors (surface area, density, composition) affect the water retention (speed, amount in soil?

 

What factors cause a humanís pulse rate to change?

 

What factors (light, temperature, food)  cause a mealworm to change?

 

What factors (concentration, temperature) cause a yeast/peroxide reaction to change (rate, amount of bubbles)?

 

What factors (air pressure, amount of water, shape of bottle) cause a bottle rocket to change its flight? (speed, height, distance, path)

 


OPEN ENDED SCIENCE QUESTIONS:

            Requires student to apply and explain a science concept.

            Has more than one aspect to a correct answer, or more than one correct answer.

            Requires higher order thinking, and relevant prior knowledge to answer completely.

 

EXPLANATION OF SCORING FOR SCIENCE OPEN ENDED ITEMS

      Each score category contains a range of student responses which reflect the descriptions given below:

 

SCORE 3

 

      This response is an excellent answer to the question. It is correct, complete, and appropriate and contains elaboration, extension, and/or evidence of higher-order thinking and relevant prior knowledge. There is no evidence of misconceptions. Minor errors will not necessarily lower the score.

 

SCORE 2

 

      This response is a proficient answer to the question. It is generally correct, complete, and appropriate although minor inaccuracies may appear. There may be limited evidence of elaboration, extension, higher-order thinking, and relevant prior knowledge, or there may be significant evidence of these traits but other flaws (e.g., inaccuracies, omissions, and inappropriateness) may be more than minor.

 

SCORE 1

 

      This response is a marginal answer to the question. While it may contain some elements of a proficient response, it is inaccurate, incomplete, and/or inappropriate. There is little if any evidence of elaboration, extension, higher-order thinking or relevant prior knowledge. There may be evidence of significant misconceptions.

 

SCORE 0

 

            The response, although may be on topic, is an unsatisfactory answer to the question. It may fail to address the question, or it may address the question in a very limited way. There may be no evidence of elaboration, extension, higher-order thinking, or relevant prior knowledge. There may be evidence of serious misconceptions

 

 

 


ANALYTIC  SCORING RUBRIC      Science Performance Tasks

SCORE          DIMENSION                                                                               

 

PROBLEM DEFINITION

 

3. The problem is stated clearly. Clear identification of independent and dependent variables.

2. The problem is stated adequately. Adequate identification of independent and dependent variables.

1. The problem is poorly stated. Poor identification of independent and dependent variables.

0. The statement of the problem is very limited or missing altogether. No identification of independent and dependent variables.                                                                          

 

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN

 

3. The experiment matches the stated problem. Variables are controlled. The procedures are clear, complete and replicable. A control is included when appropriate.       

2. The experimental design generally matches the stated problem. Attempt at controlling variables is made. Procedures are generally complete. Minor modifications or clarifications may be needed.

1. The experimental design matches the stated problem to some extent. Little attempt to control

variables. Procedures are incomplete. Major modifications or clarifications may be needed.     

0. The experimental design does not match the stated problem, is very incomplete or missing.

No attempt to control variables.                                                                           

 

DATA PRESENTATION

 

3. Data are accurate, complete, well-organized and presented in an appropriate manner.

2. Data are generally accurate, complete, organized and presented in an appropriate manner. Minor errors or omissions may be present.  

1. Data are somewhat  inaccurate, incomplete, poorly organized  and presented in an inappropriate manner. Major errors or omissions may be present.      

0. Data are highly inaccurate, incomplete, poorly organized or presented in an inappropriate manner or missing altogether.                                                          

 

CONCLUSIONS

 

3. Conclusions are related to the stated problem and fully supported by the data. Validity of conclusions is thoroughly discussed.

2. Conclusions are generally related to the stated problem and fully supported by the data. Minor errors in the interpretation of the results may be present. Discussion of validity of conclusions is limited.

1. Conclusions are related to the stated problem and supported by the data to a limited extent. Major errors in interpretation of results may be present. Little discussion of validity of conclusions.

0. Conclusions are not related to the stated problem, not supported by data or are missing. No discussion of validity of conclusions.

 


SUFFIELD HIGH SCHOOL

SCHOOL WIDE RUBRIC SCIENCE

Expectation 4:

Know and apply the basic concepts of and the interrelations among Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth (including Ecology) and Space Sciences.

 

Superior.  The studentís work demonstrates and ability to answer questions correctly, completely, and appropriately.  The studentís responses to assessment contain elaboration, extension, and/or evidence of higher-order thinking and relevant prior knowledge. The student is able to design, conduct, and analyze experiments.

 

Standard.  The student has shown proficiency in answering science questions in a correct, complete, and appropriate manner although minor inaccuracies may appear.  There may be limited evidence in the studentís work of elaboration, extension, higher-order thinking, and relevant prior knowledge, or there may be significant evidence of these traits but other flaws (e.g., inaccuracies, omissions, and inappropriateness) may be more than minor. The student can conduct and analyze experiments but may be unable to completely design one without some assistance.

 

Limited.  The studentís work shows marginal understanding.  While it may contain some elements of proficiency, the studentís response to assessment is inaccurate, incomplete and/or inappropriate.  There is little if any evidence of elaboration, extension, higher-order thinking or relevant prior knowledge.  There may be evidence of significant misconceptions.  The student is able to conduct an experiment but has difficulty analyzing the results correctly.  The student is unable to design an experiment but may offer some elements of the design.

 

Insufficient.  The studentís work is unsatisfactory.  Studentís responses to assessment may fail to address the question, or may address the question in a very limited way.  There may be no evidence of elaboration, extension, higher-order thinking, or relevant prior knowledge.  There may be evidence of serious misconceptions.  The student is marginally able to conduct an experiment and unable to analyze the data results. The student is unable to offer any elements of an experiment design.